Stanford Men's Golf Team 2007 NCAA National Champions
History of Stanford Golf
Stanford's remarkable history has left its mark on the golf world.
Stanford Greats
The names are legendary: Little, Seaver, Rosburg, Watson & Woods and others.
All-Americans
Numberous All-Americans played at Stanford over the years.
National Champions
9 national championships have been won, including in 2019.
Men's Golf Members of the Stanford Athletics Hall of Fame + Grant Spaeth
Malcolm McNaughton '31 Charles Seaver '34 Lawson Little '34 Don Edwards '36
Art Doering '40 Warren Berl '42 Bud Brownell '42 Sandy Tatum '42
Bob Cardinal '47 Eddie Twiggs '32-47 Bob Rosburg '49 Dick McElyea '52
Steve Smith '61 Tom Watson '71 Bud Finger '48-76 Christian Cevaer '92
Notay Begay '95 Casey Martin '95 Tiger Woods '96 Joel Kribel '99
Wally Goodwin '00 Grant Spaeth '54

Grant Spaeth

"Born to serve the game of golf"

A collection of stories about "Biggie" by his many friends

grantspaeth_400 Grant Spaeth. He was a letter winner on the 1952, 1953 and 1954 teams and a member of the 1953 National Championship team. Grant was inducted into the Northern California Golf Association Hall of Fame in 2011 which included the following tribute to him.

Grant Spaeth's lifelong impact on golf actually is the reverse – the game impacted him and never let go. From his NCAA team title at Stanford in 1953 to his eventful years from 1990 to ’92 as president of the United States Golf Association, Spaeth’s contribution to the game continued throughout his life. Simply, Spaeth was born to serve the game. Through it all, Spaeth’s affection for the game remained rich.

He was a graduate of Palo Alto High and the son of the Dean of the Stanford Law School. While his father was stationed in Montevideo, Uruguay, Spaeth was introduced to golf on a course across the street from his home. Later as a teenager, he caddied for the Stanford golf team, and it wasn’t too long before he and his Stanford teammates became national champions.

Spaeth graduated from the Harvard Law School and served in the U.S. Army followed by the Reserves. His law practice in Palo Alto was the foundation to years of public service. Spaeth was the Deputy Secretary for the Department of Health, Education and Welfare from 1978 to ’80 and also served as a Palo Alto city councilman.

Then came years of work on various USGA committees, leading to his USGA presidency and a list of accomplishments to remember. He may have been the best reach-out-to-people person who ever filled the USGA president’s chair. Spaeth was instrumental in bringing the British Open back to Carnoustie, Scotland. He founded the U.S. Men’s Mid-Amateur and Women’s Mid-Amateur Championships. He created the USGA’s regional affairs departments.

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On Sunday mornings before the final round of the Masters, he often walked Augusta National’s back nine alone, savoring the memories and the promise of what was ahead. Closer to home, he entertained TV viewers on “Hooked on Golf” with his articulate, entertaining and informative essays on the game and its rules. “I want more people exposed to the game,” he said recently. “Those who take to it will be lucky and should be thankful.” The Northern California Golf Association is proud and honored to induct Grant Spaeth to its Hall of Fame.

Grant Spaeth passed on July 28, 2020 at the age of 88.
Obituaries: USGA | Golf Digest | SF Chronicle | Palo Alto Online
Oral History Transcript: Stanford historical society

Oct 5, 2007. Grant Spaeth Interview - 26 minutes

  • Part I - Grant talks about his early golf experiences in Uruguay, at PA High School and at Stanford - 9:47 minutes
  • Part II - Shares an experience with Tiger Woods when Grant captained a World Cup team - 4:47 minutes
  • Part III - Grant talks about Bob Rosburg at Stanford - 2:47 minutes
  • Part IV - Grant talks about his great Stanford teams and the outstanding teammates such as Fred Brown, Warren Dailey, Art Schroeder and others - 7:44 minutes
  • Part V - Grant talks about his boyhood friend and teammate Dick McElyea who became a Stanford Hall of Fame inductee - 2:12 minutes